Pax Victoriana

NATIONAL PHOTOGRAPHIC RECORD & SURVEY (c. 1900) — A *SECOND* SELECTION

A second batch of images, all again by Edgar Scamell (one of the chief photographers of the National Photographic Record and Survey): 

  1. Photograph of ‘a street hawker selling china’ by Edgar Scamell (1892);
  2. 'Nevill's Court / Turning Off Fetter Lane / Holborn' by Edgar Scamell (1900);
  3. Photograph of newspaper boy — carrying Telegraph (?) with headline ‘DEEMING INQUEST SCENES VERDICT’, possibly referring to the 1892 murder in Windsor St. in Melbourne by Francis Bailey Deeming, taken in the media as minor Jack the Ripper; photo by Edgar Scamell (1890? or 1892?);
  4. '47 Leicester Sq. London / Sir Joshua Reynold's House' by Edgar Scamell (August 1899).

Coming off my discovery yesterday of the National Photographic Record and Survey, whose images range from 1855-1909 in the Victoria & Albert Museum collections, I’ve picked a handful of particularly captivating or illustrative shots. As I said, the entire group’s photographs can be seen if you visit the V&A’s collections.

First round of photographs here [x]!

posted 2 days ago with 11 notes

NATIONAL PHOTOGRAPHIC RECORD & SURVEY (c. 1900) — A SELECTION

Coming off my discovery yesterday of the National Photographic Record and Survey, whose images range from 1855-1909 in the Victoria & Albert Museum collections, I’ve picked a handful of particularly captivating or illustrative shots. As I said, the entire group’s photographs can be seen if you visit the V&A’s collections.

  1.  'House Fleet St / Entrance to the Temple' by Edgar Scamell (August 1899);
  2. 'Newgate Prison' by Edgar Scamell (1901);
  3. 'Blackfriars Bridge' by Edgar Scamell (1894);
  4. Photograph of ‘a street hawker selling baked potatoes’ by Edgar Scamell (1892)

Another round of images here!

posted 2 days ago with 3 notes

My next blog?: MY VICTORIAN/EDWARDIAN BOYFRIEND/GIRLFRIEND
Sometimes, in the course of my research wanderings, I come across a collection of images that makes me go a bit wobbly. Today, I discovered the V&A's collection of the National Photographic Record and Survey images, some 1000+ photographs taken of Britain and its people between 1855 and 1909.
Then, in looking up the background for these amazing documents, I found the portrait (shown above): 'Lunch party at the House of Commons on the occasion of the presentation of photographs to the “House”' at the National Portrait Gallery.
And thus we come to my new blog. Not only are the men pictured above dapper as anything, they also sport — as do some of the men and women (alas, not pictured visiting Parliament) — some of the best Victorian/Edwardian names I’ve ever read:

James Blyth, 1st Baron Blyth (1841-1925), Agriculturalist and businessman; Patron of numerous public bodies; Advocate of cheap postage. 
William James Downer (1851-1939), Civil servant. 
Mr Emory, Journalist for The Times. 
Sir Francis Alexander Newdigate Newdegate (1862-1936), Politician. 
Alfred Young Nutt (1847-1924), Architect. 
Sir Alfred Farthing Robbins (1856-1931), Journalist and author. 
Francis Owen (‘Frank’) Salisbury (1874-1962), Painter. 
George Scamell. [National Photographic Record and Survey photographer]
Edward John Long Scott (1840-1918), Keeper of Muniments at Westminster Abbey. 
Sir James Dods Shaw (1848-1916), Parliamentary reporter, newspaper editor and writer. 
Sir Arthur Herbert Drummond Ramsay Steel-Maitland, 1st Bt (1876-1935), Politician and economist. 
(Frederick) Primrose Stevenson (1867-1935), Political press correspondent. 
Sir (John) Benjamin Stone (1838-1914), Politician; Birmingham East and photographer. [x]

Not pictured, but involved (according to the V&A) are:

George Scamell’s brother (?), Edgar (93 images);
Godfrey Bingley (513 images);
Basil E. Lawrence (47 images);
Henry Walter Fincham (170 images);
Mrs Weed Ward (100 images);
Miss Lucy E Beedham (12 images);
Miss I. Niblett
Revd. CI Moncrieff Smyth
Revd. E. Travers Clark
B Diveri (122 images, mostly of the North of England);
Mrs FH Gandy
Mrs FM Muriel
R Welch (70 images, mostly of Ireland)
GH Woodfall
and numerous others…

So: any takers for a c. 1900 boyfriend, ladies and gents?
For more of the Survey’s images, visit the V&A’s collections.

My next blog?: MY VICTORIAN/EDWARDIAN BOYFRIEND/GIRLFRIEND

Sometimes, in the course of my research wanderings, I come across a collection of images that makes me go a bit wobbly. Today, I discovered the V&A's collection of the National Photographic Record and Survey images, some 1000+ photographs taken of Britain and its people between 1855 and 1909.

Then, in looking up the background for these amazing documents, I found the portrait (shown above): 'Lunch party at the House of Commons on the occasion of the presentation of photographs to the “House”' at the National Portrait Gallery.

And thus we come to my new blog. Not only are the men pictured above dapper as anything, they also sport — as do some of the men and women (alas, not pictured visiting Parliament) — some of the best Victorian/Edwardian names I’ve ever read:

Not pictured, but involved (according to the V&A) are:

  • George Scamell’s brother (?), Edgar (93 images);
  • Godfrey Bingley (513 images);
  • Basil E. Lawrence (47 images);
  • Henry Walter Fincham (170 images);
  • Mrs Weed Ward (100 images);
  • Miss Lucy E Beedham (12 images);
  • Miss I. Niblett
  • Revd. CI Moncrieff Smyth
  • Revd. E. Travers Clark
  • B Diveri (122 images, mostly of the North of England);
  • Mrs FH Gandy
  • Mrs FM Muriel
  • R Welch (70 images, mostly of Ireland)
  • GH Woodfall
  • and numerous others…

So: any takers for a c. 1900 boyfriend, ladies and gents?

For more of the Survey’s images, visit the V&A’s collections.

posted 3 days ago with 7 notes


Life of a Young Pedantic Scholar

arabella-strange:

Things that make me giddy:

- 1960s books of Victorian photographs.

image

Things that make me want to scream:

-1960s shitty scholarship

-unsourced photographs

-shoddy dating on old images/artefacts

-subjective, unclear, and probably just, you know, blatantly false statements passed off as research ‘captions’

image


FRENCH LETTERS AND POPULATION CONTROL

@BNArchive: ‘RT @News_of_1890s: What a phrase! “Malthusian appliances”- superb ad from Illustrated Police News 1899 via @BNArchive pic.twitter.com/2pEAZbpn79' [twitter]

From The Illustrated Police News, 18 Nov. 1899 (iss. 1866): a (subtle, coded) classified advertisement for condoms. 
As numerous scholars have noted, ‘The word [condom] itself was apparently not used until 1705; its origins are obscure, though the French considered it an English invention, using the phrase “la capote anglaise" (the English cape), while the British had long used the term "French letters”’ (Joan Lane, A Social History of Medicine (2012), p. 37).
Revd. Robert Malthus was an eighteenth/early nineteenth-century economist, philosopher, and sociologist, who wrote extensively on the dangers of unrestrained population growth. Malthus foresaw what became known as a ‘Malthusian check' or 'catastrophe' when the geometric rise in population became insupportable by the arithmetical increase in food and resources [VW]. Many nineteenth-century thinkers, including Charles Dickens and Thomas Hardy, were opposed to the cruel inhumanity of Malthusian economics by which certain weak members of the population were better off dead, and place responsibility and blame on those members of society who reach beyond their means. Hardy famously paraphrased Malthus’s writings in the [spoilers] infamous multiple-suicide note at the end of Jude the Obscure, in the note: ‘Done because we are too menny.’

FRENCH LETTERS AND POPULATION CONTROL

@BNArchive: ‘RT : What a phrase! “Malthusian appliances”- superb ad from Illustrated Police News 1899 via ' [twitter]

From The Illustrated Police News, 18 Nov. 1899 (iss. 1866): a (subtle, coded) classified advertisement for condoms

As numerous scholars have noted, ‘The word [condom] itself was apparently not used until 1705; its origins are obscure, though the French considered it an English invention, using the phrase “la capote anglaise" (the English cape), while the British had long used the term "French letters”’ (Joan Lane, A Social History of Medicine (2012), p. 37).

Revd. Robert Malthus was an eighteenth/early nineteenth-century economist, philosopher, and sociologist, who wrote extensively on the dangers of unrestrained population growth. Malthus foresaw what became known as a ‘Malthusian check' or 'catastrophe' when the geometric rise in population became insupportable by the arithmetical increase in food and resources [VW]. Many nineteenth-century thinkers, including Charles Dickens and Thomas Hardy, were opposed to the cruel inhumanity of Malthusian economics by which certain weak members of the population were better off dead, and place responsibility and blame on those members of society who reach beyond their means. Hardy famously paraphrased Malthus’s writings in the [spoilers] infamous multiple-suicide note at the end of Jude the Obscure, in the note: ‘Done because we are too menny.’

posted 2 weeks ago with 1 note

theparisreview:

When Charlotte Brontë was thirteen and her brother, Branwell, was twelve, they designed and wrote a series of tiny books: “Measuring less than one inch by two inches, the books were made from scraps of paper and constructed by hand. Despite their diminutive size, the books contained big adventures, written in ink in careful script.”
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

theparisreview:

When Charlotte Brontë was thirteen and her brother, Branwell, was twelve, they designed and wrote a series of tiny books: “Measuring less than one inch by two inches, the books were made from scraps of paper and constructed by hand. Despite their diminutive size, the books contained big adventures, written in ink in careful script.”

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.


letuscrossovertheriver:

July 3rd, 1863

The final day of Gettysburg rages in Pennsylvania. With Lieut. Gen. Ewell engaged at Culp’s Hill, Lee aims for a co-ordinated attack on the Federal left. After orders are misunderstood, he directs his attention on the Union centre at Cemetery Ridge. An artillery bombardment takes place upon it followed by the infamous ‘Pickett’s Charge’, a disaster for Confederate forces. A cavalry battle between Maj. Gen Stuart and Brig. Gen. Gregg also takes place East of Gettysburg.
The Battle of Gettysburg ends with approximately 23,000 Union casualties and between 20,000 and 28,000 Confederate casualties. After the Union victory, Lee retreats with his army back across into Virginia. He would no longer launch any major assaults on Northern soil. (x) (x) (x)


"'But there's nothing like work. Look at the bees.'
‘I beg your pardon,’ returned Eugene, with a reluctant smile, ‘but will you excuse my mentioning that I always protest against being referred to the bees?’
‘Do you!’ said Mr Boffin.
‘I object on principle,’ said Eugene, ‘as a biped—’
‘As a what?’ asked Mr Boffin.
‘As a two-footed creature;—I object on principle, as a two-footed creature, to being constantly referred to insects and four-footed creatures. I object to being required to model my proceedings according to the proceedings of the bee, or the dog, or the spider, or the camel. I fully admit that the camel, for instance, is an excessively temperate person; but he has several stomachs to entertain himself with, and I have only one. Besides, I am not fitted up with a convenient cool cellar to keep my drink in.’
‘But I said, you know,’ urged Mr Boffin, rather at a loss for an answer, ‘the bee.’
‘Exactly. And may I represent to you that it’s injudicious to say the bee? For the whole case is assumed. Conceding for a moment that there is any analogy between a bee, and a man in a shirt and pantaloons (which I deny), and that it is settled that the man is to learn from the bee (which I also deny), the question still remains, what is he to learn? To imitate? Or to avoid? When your friends the bees worry themselves to that highly fluttered extent about their sovereign, and become perfectly distracted touching the slightest monarchical movement, are we men to learn the greatness of Tuft-hunting, or the littleness of the Court Circular? I am not clear, Mr Boffin, but that the hive may be satirical.’
‘At all events, they work,’ said Mr Boffin.
‘Ye-es,’ returned Eugene, disparagingly, ‘they work; but don’t you think they overdo it? They work so much more than they need—they make so much more than they can eat—they are so incessantly boring and buzzing at their one idea till Death comes upon them—that don’t you think they overdo it? And are human labourers to have no holidays, because of the bees? And am I never to have change of air, because the bees don’t? Mr Boffin, I think honey excellent at breakfast; but, regarded in the light of my conventional schoolmaster and moralist, I protest against the tyrannical humbug of your friend the bee.’"
Our Mutual Friend, Charles Dickens [ch. 8]
posted 3 weeks ago with 4 notes